“I’ve said to people before that I’m going to do my very best to make it, I’m not going to give up. But I might not make it… if I don’t, the Marathon of Hope better continue.”

“There can be no reason for me to stop. No matter what pain I suffer, it is nothing compared to the pain of those who have cancer, of those who endure treatment.”

“I’ve got cancer in my lungs. We have to go home and do some more treatments. But all I can say is that if there is any way I can get out there and finish, I will.”

“Today we got up at 4:00 am. As usual, it was tough. If I died, I would die happy because I was doing what I wanted to do. How many people could say that? I went out and did fifteen push-ups in the road and took off. I want to set an example that will never be forgotten.”

“I got satisfaction out of doing things that were difficult. It was an incredible feeling. The pain was there, but the pain didn’t matter.”

“To me, being famous myself is not the idea of the run, and it wasn’t from the very beginning. To me, the only important part is the Marathon of Hope.”
“It took cancer to realize that being self-centered is not the way to live. The answer is to try and help others.”

“I could not leave [the cancer ward] knowing these faces and feelings would still exist, even though I would be set free from mine. I was determined to take myself to the limit for this cause.”

“They seem to forget what I’m doing this for. They think I’m running across Canada on some kind of an ego trip. It is a personal challenge, but I’m trying to raise as much money as I can for a very important cause. I need their financial support.”

“People take it the wrong way when I say I want to run alone. But I have to do it my own way. I have to really concentrate to ignore the pain and keep going. Sometimes I’m actually crying while I’m running but I just don’t think about it.”

“I set daily goals for myself, and it’s really important that I achieve them. I need to have a daily sense of accomplishment. I know if I fall short of those goals that I will never finish.”

“I decided to take it (cancer) as it was. I didn’t want people to feel sorry for me. I wanted to do everything I could, everything that could be done.”
“When I started this run, I said that if we all gave one dollar, we’d have $22 million for cancer research, and I don’t care man, there’s no reason that isn’t possible. No reason!”

“I’m not doing the run to become rich or famous.”

“It’s one thing to run across Canada, but now, people are really going to know what cancer is.”

“People were still lining the road saying, ‘Keep going, don’t give up, you can do it, you can make it, we’re all behind you.’ There was a camera crew waiting to film me. I don’t think they even realized that they had filmed my last mile… people were still saying, ‘You can make it all the way Terry’. I started to think about those comments in that mile too. Yeah, I thought, this might be my last one.”

“I’m not a dreamer, and I’m not saying this will initiate any kind of definitive answer or cure to cancer, but I believe in miracles. I have to.”